Break


It’s not the carbon tax, David Jones. It’s you.

INDIGNANT shoppers have bombarded David Jones’ Facebook page with angry comments after the Australian retail giant blamed the carbon tax for its poor sale performance.

David Jones chief executive Paul Zahra told The Age the Gillard government’s looming carbon tax had dampened consumer confidence.

“As far back as our records show, we haven’t seen these sort of declines in sales,” he told The Age.

The carbon tax is only set to be in effect starting July 1, 2012.

Disgruntled consumers have dominated David Jones’ Facebook Wall since mid-morning to vent their annoyance and announce their plans to boycott the retailer.

“Sorry to hear your sales woes are the result of carbon pricing… are you serious?? It hasn’t even been fully passed in Parliament yet – how can it possibly be affecting your sales?” one shopper said.

“The brand damage you’ll incur from this will make other retailers think twice before making such outrageous claims,” said another.

Other consumers said they stopped shopping at David Jones because its products were “marked too high” and staff were sometimes “rude and unhelpful”.

Most of the international students Meld Magazine asked said they wouldn’t shop at David Jones.

“Nope, I don’t shop much at David Jones because most of the stuff sold there are too expensive,” Rachel Tan, 20, said.

Jasmine Yap, 22, said she didn’t have the “excess budget to shop there”.

Nicola Robyn, 20, said she only shopped at David Jones “occasionally” because it was “sort of higher end”.

“I don’t really want to spend that sort of money on clothes or household items,” she said.

“David, where?” another student asked.

“I’m not very familiar with the place,” he said.

Do you shop at David Jones? Is the carbon tax to blame for its poor sales performance? Tell us in the comments section below.

2 total comments on this postSubmit yours
  1. that’s almost as ridiculous as saying the length of skirts are lengthen when the economy is poor. there’s no direct relations at all! I heard from a friend that the government is thinking of increasing minimum wage to $15 now anyway to counter the taxes. also, if you weigh it out for those who are affected, the only pinch you’re going to feel is about $10 per week. that’s one hour of a minimum work wage which i’m sure oil companies are not paying out to their employees, c’mon.

  2. Not to mention,
    High prices and ‘Made in China/Vietnam/India etc’ are irksome, because we know their costs and see prices that would easily support Australian manufacturers, thankyou for outsourcing the future.

    It should come as no surprise to DJ’s that shoppers are deserting them in droves. Coiuple this tothe rise of conomical, easy and effective internet shopping and these companies are doomed if they don’t radically revise their retailling model.

    To DJ’s management: Lowering the the GST import thereshold won’t make speck of difference because the differential as about 50%, not the 10% of the GST, aslo we like having it delivered. It won’t save you.

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Meld Magazine was incorporated as an independent not-for-profit media outlet in September 2008 to reach out to international students in Melbourne, and provide students the opportunity to gain real work experience.

Many international students live in or around the city because of the proximity to their colleges and universities, and that was where we decided to focus our efforts first. Many of us live, work and study locally too. Our editorial team is made of both local and international students, and it has worked to our advantage in providing local content in every sense of the word.

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