Making music: A look at Trinity College’s Jam Sessions

DID you know that Trinity College has its own jam sessions after classes? Trinity College Foundation Studies students Adibah Amani Nasarudin and Xu Zhang talk to the people involved and encourages other students to join. 

Photo: Amani Nasarudin

Come down to Trinity College’s Jam Sessions every Monday, Wednesday and Friday! Photo: Amani Nasarudin

Looking for a place to jam after a long day of study? Trinity College’s Jam Sessions is the perfect avenue for students to come along and play music that they like.

Daniel Townsend, a tutor at Trinity College, facilitates these jam sessions and leads students from different backgrounds to not only share their musical skills but to also build a network.

The jam sessions were initiated as a result of some students’ expressing their desire to continue playing music.

“People lose their touch on music because they live in places where they can’t have musical instruments,” said Daniel.

With quality instruments provided and a friendly crowd to play to, students can feel safe and comfortable performing and playing with people who share a common interest in music as they do.

The session also offers a place for students to play music without the fear of disturbing their neighbours in their apartments.

Photo: Amani Nasarudin

Students Claudia and Tsara singing at the Jam Sessions. Photo: Amani Nasarudin

Mingling with peers who possess different musical interests, Tsara Ali, a soul-pop singer, said that jam sessions has broadened her musical perspective as well as improved her interactive skills.

Another singer, arts student Yi Zhen, said she also jams “to know what it’s like to be involved in a band”.

Aside from socialising and regular jamming, students also come to practise for actual performances like Trinity’s music concerts where other students in the session may also act as judges.

These judges give students the opportunity to receive feedback and have a sense of how it is like to perform in front of an audience.

Photo: Amani Nasarudin

A student drummer practising his craft. Photo: Amani Nasarudin

Unfortunately, not many students know about these jam sessions.

“There is not much publication of it,” said Joan, one of the guitarists involved with the jam sessions.

The group also wishes for more students to participate in these sessions and feel that the more people there are, the easier it is to spread musical knowledge and most importantly, fun!

Feel like joining the sessions? Come down to Classroom 9, 715 Swanston St every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 5.30pm to 7.30pm.

This story was produced by Media and Communication students at Trinity College Foundation Studies as part of Meld’s community newsroom collab. Education institutions, student clubs/societies and community groups interested in being involved can get in touch us via

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