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Brunswick Music Festival returns as Melbourne’s multicultural mecca

BRUNSWICK Music Festival – the melting pot of live music, cuisine, and multiculturalism – is coming to Melbourne this March. Dea Putra explains what’s in store for the event.

Photograph by Sarah Anderson

Laneway Festival too ‘mainstream’ for you? Try attending this instead. Image supplied.

If you’re looking to expand your horizons in terms of music from around the world, then look no further than the upcoming Brunswick Music Festival, happening between March 15 and 20.

The festival boasts a diverse range of local, national, and international talents across various genres — giving spectators a chance to either delve into one genre of music or explore multiple across the festival’s five days.

Tintype of Jerron Paxton by Bill Steber ©2014

Watch rising star bluesman Blind Boy Paxton live in action this March. Image supplied.

Described as the most talented acoustic blues musician to come along in years, Blind Boy Paxton (USA) is a one man band of seven instruments. His musical stylings will transport audiences back to the 1920s as he plays pre-World War II blues, reminiscent of artists like Fats Waller or “Blind” Lemon Jefferson.

Witness two worlds collide as Magna Grecia combines southern Italian folk music with Greek orchestral ensemble and of course, traditional rustic cuisine.

If you’re looking for something more poppy, there is also Alsarah and the Nubatones (Sudan/USA), who present an eclectic mix of East African inspired electro pop.

MMK_PressShot2013_YusukeKitamura

With a name as funky as ‘Mount Mocha Kilimanjaro’, their music will also evoke you with awe and wonder. Image supplied.

Meanwhile, Mount Mocha Kilimanjaro (Japan) is guaranteed to sway you with their own brand of instrumental music, dubbed ‘Godzilla funk’.

As for those looking to catch a glimpse of Indigenous Australian culture, Djuki Mala creates an interesting fusion of traditional culture, contemporary dance, and storytelling.

Djuki Mala The Chooky Dancers. photo by Sean Young - SYC Studios

There is art in the fusion of time and elements, and Djuki Mala aims to do just that. Image supplied.

You can also attend the Asylum Seeker Welcome Centre Dinner held by the Brunswick Uniting Church, where you can enjoy performances by the likes of South Sudan’s Ajak Kwai, Turkey’s Bashra, and Indonesian group Jawa Pitu Band.

And to top it off, the festival will close with a bang as Cumbia Massive teleport you to sunny Latin America with their Colombian folklore ensemble, along with Melbourne’s biggest tropical DJs.

The Brunswick Music Festival takes place this March 15 – 20, at Sydney Road. The program list and more information can be found on their official website.

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