Break


Four ways to showcase your talents to a public audience

WANT to find a way to showcase your talents in public? Trinity College Foundation Studies students Pravina Shandre, Chloe Ni Liu & Echo Minqiu Rao find out the four best ways to express yourself creatively, build confidence and show off your skills to an audience. 

Are you an international student with talents that need to be showcased and expressed in public?

If you want to do something a little bit more creative and break out of your studying habits outside of school hours, there are plenty of ways that students can express themselves in a public forum and showcase some of their hidden talents.

Whether by song, dance, writing or music, you’ll find the following modes of talent showcasing in Melbourne to be the best ways to show off your skills and build up confidence.

Busking

Photo: sarah-ji via Flickr

Photo: sarah-ji via Flickr

Whatever your skill may be — whether its singing, performing magic or playing a musical instrument — there perhaps is no better way showcase your talents than by busking.

Through busking, students can build up their confidence through street performance. Learning to play to an audience and overcoming any fears of public performance will no doubt help students build character.

There are however rules and regulations that students need to follow in order to legally perform on the streets of Melbourne, which they can learn all about in a previous Trinity College Foundation Studies story.

Dance classes

Photo: Yogi Pratama Khosugi

Photo: Yogi Pratama Khosugi

The University of Melbourne’s Flare Dance Ensemble holds classes every Wednesday for students with all different kinds of styles and is not restricted to just students of that university.

If you’re a student who wants to perfect their dancing technique or learn more about other styles of dancing, classes with Flare Dance Ensemble are a great way to not only learn but show off what you can do on the dance floor.

Classes are generally free and not compulsory, which is great for students who are quite rigid with their time. More on the benefits of joining a dance ensemble like Flare can be found in a previous Trinity College Foundation Studies story.

Creative Links

photo-creative-links

Creative Links is website that Trinity College students can access via the school’s Portal. If you’re a student with an aptitude for the arts — specifically in writing and photography — the site is a great way for students to show their creative work with their peers.

In order to get your work shown onto the website Ms Cara Burgio, Media and eLearning Systems Officer at Trinity College said students needed to contact her and “provide a copy of their work [so that] it can be uploaded onto the page”.

School concerts

Image: Linda Linda Linda (2005, dir Nobuhiro Yamashita)

Still from Linda Linda Linda (2005, dir Nobuhiro Yamashita)

Concerts and talent shows are quite common in schools and are usually quite popular within the student body. For some students, performing in front of their peers might be challenging but for Sunny, who likes singing, she said school concerts have provided her a platform to not only showcase and hone her skills as a performer but help her realise her passion for music.

“School concerts made me realise how much I love music and this became the reason that I decided to study music in university,” Sunny said.

To sign up for school concerts, all students need to do is look out for advertisements around campus where they can follow the guidelines and instructions to qualify. Alternatively sign-up sheets may be available.

This story was produced by Media and Communication students at Trinity College Foundation Studies as part of Meld’s community newsroom collaboration. Education institutions, student clubs/societies and community groups interested in being involved can get in touch with us via meld@meldmagazine.com.au.

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Meld Magazine was incorporated as an independent not-for-profit media outlet in September 2008 to reach out to international students in Melbourne, and provide students the opportunity to gain real work experience.

Many international students live in or around the city because of the proximity to their colleges and universities, and that was where we decided to focus our efforts first. Many of us live, work and study locally too. Our editorial team is made of both local and international students, and it has worked to our advantage in providing local content in every sense of the word.

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