Break


New Gateway Building for foundation studies students to serve as social and academic hub

THE construction of Trinity College’s Gateway Building will lead to more facilities that students and staff of the college will benefit from. Trinity College Foundation Studies students Qin Minzhi, Ahmed Ainuddin and Peter Leung spoke to Director of Major Projects and Infrastructure, Gary Norman, about the new building. 

An illustration of the Gateway Building, opening to students and staff of Trinity College on August 22. | Photo: Qin Minzhi

An illustration of the Gateway Building, opening to students and staff of Trinity College on August 22. | Photo: Qin Minzhi

A new building constructed for Trinity College Foundation Studies students will arrive on August 22, offering more facilities for students and staff of the college.

The building, named the Gateway Building, will serve as the centre for various educational and cultural programs at Trinity College.

The Gateway Building will have four levels which will include the basement, ground floor and two upper levels. It will consist of a 300 seat auditorium, 25 classrooms, a physics laboratory, five drama rooms and five music practice rooms. A gallery presenting the college’s history and other cultural collections will also be installed.

Common spaces for students will also be available and will come furbished with computers, tables, sofas and a student kitchen.

Gary Norman has been responsible for the delivery of the construction and has largely overseen the operation. | Photo: Peter Leung

Gary Norman has been responsible for the delivery of the construction and has largely overseen the operation. | Photo: Peter Leung

Gary Norman, Director of Major Projects and Infrastructure, has been busy overseeing the building’s construction and says the idea for this new building was first conceived in 2010 when the need for a performing arts centre arose. Plans shifted once it had been decided that the centre would become an educational facility.

Approval of the building’s construction took some time getting off the ground as ideas on the building’s design, functionality and flexibility needed consultation from students, staff members, the College Board, and other relevant committees.

A walkway between the Leper Library and the Gateway Building, for example, has been erected to make travelling between both buildings more convenient. Other features such as the Gateway Building’s solitary elevator have been designed with students’ health in mind, as Mr Norman hopes it will encourage students to get more exercise.

Construction of the building is still taking place and is almost ready for students and staff to use. | Photo: Peter Leung

Construction of the building is still taking place and is almost ready for students and staff to use. | Photo: Peter Leung

Furthermore, the Gateway Building has also been designed to be environmentally sustainable. A tank, located underground, will store rainwater passing through the building’s roof which will then be used to irrigate the landscape. Mr Norman also mentions that recycled timber has been used for the building’s construction. Motion detected light sensors will also be installed.

Serving as a purpose built facility for students tired of moving from one building to the next, Mr Norman envisions that all these features will help make the new Gateway Building become a social and academic hub for all students. In other words, once the building is open to students on August 22, they’ll be able to make themselves at home.

This story was produced by Media and Communication students at Trinity College Foundation Studies as part of Meld’s community newsroom collaboration. Education institutions, student clubs/societies and community groups interested in being involved can get in touch with us via meld@meldmagazine.com.au.

Submit your comment

Please enter your name

Please enter a valid email address

Please enter your message

About

Meld Magazine was incorporated as an independent not-for-profit media outlet in September 2008 to reach out to international students in Melbourne, and provide students the opportunity to gain real work experience.

Many international students live in or around the city because of the proximity to their colleges and universities, and that was where we decided to focus our efforts first. Many of us live, work and study locally too. Our editorial team is made of both local and international students, and it has worked to our advantage in providing local content in every sense of the word.

Meld Magazine – Melbourne's international student news website © 2016 All Rights Reserved